Clear, fresh and sweet water …

Chagall arca di noe

Marc Chagall, Noah’s Ark, 1966, Musée national Message Biblique Marc Chagall, Nice, France

Good morning, folks!

I’m in the mood for poetry today! I ignore if you know this verse, since it’s originally in Italian. Words of love by an Immortal Italian poet, Francesco Petrarca. ‘Chiare, fresche e dolci acque,ove le membra pose colei che sola a me par donna …‘ (clear, fresh and sweet water, where she – the only woman to me – rested her beautiful limbs). A hymn to love and to beauty and an awesome love declaration. But it’s not about love that I’m going to talk today. It’s all about … water. Clear, fresh and sweet water. At least, so I guess it might taste to a thirsty Indian wanderer …

chagal

PRONUNCIATION:
(CHAH-guhl)
MEANING:
noun: A bag, usually made of canvas or leather, used for carrying water.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Hindi chhagal, from Sanskrit chhagala (of a goat). Earliest documented use: 1909.
USAGE:
“The man was drinking thirstily from a chagal of water.”
Tony Clunn; Quest for the Lost Roman Legions; Savas Beatie; 2005.
Note: More frequently spelled as  ‘chagul
ITALIAN TRANSLATION: I DUNNO
Seriously, I don’t think that such a term can be translated into my language, it’s typically used in the Oriental countries, I don’t even think I have ever seen one in my life.
Have you tried to type the word ‘chagal’ in your browser? Have you seen what’s the result? Tons of links related to Marc Chagall, not a single mention to the word chagal. I did the same and therefore I opted for one of Chagall’s masterpieces to embellish my post. J’adore Marc Chagall. Not the whole and titanic production, to be honest, I don’t like his cubist period (1910-14), for example, but I love his religious works, the Illustrations to the Bible are smashing, so vivid in colours and composition, so evocative, so vibrant. He was an awesome artist, master of colour and media. His production is gigantic. I know this has not too much in common with the topic, but you might be surprised to discover that there’s an invisible thread binding Chagall to the theme of A.W.A.D. weekly selection (obviously, it’s invisible if you don’t know Chagall’s works). Do I really need to tell you? Goats. Goats were often portrayed in Chagall’s works (see The Bride, for example), probably because they symbolized purification for the Jewish people. For Christians, instead, it’s water. Goat and water.
Do you see the thread, now?
See you soon, folks …
Your passionate (Italian) Translator
P.S.: I couldn’t resist, I had to insert ‘La Mariée’ into this post, I love it too much!
Marc_Chagall_The_Bride_15351

Marc Chagall, La Mariée (the Bride), 1950

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16 responses to “Clear, fresh and sweet water …

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