The promise (I made)

Good morning, folks

As promised (hence the title) this post closes A.W.A.D. selection, Words about words, week 39. It’s a sort of ‘buy one – get one free’, two words in a single post. It’s a bargain, considering that I will avoid my usual cheap talk on everything and concentrate on words and their relevant italian translation. As a plus, you will get a vintage music track (The promise you made by Cock Robin, year 1985) and a fine art illustration

lapsus linguae

PRONUNCIATION:
(LAP-suhs LING-gwee, LAHP-soos LING-gwy)
MEANING:
noun: A slip of the tongue.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin lapsus linguae (slip of the tongue). Earliest documented use: 1668.
NOTES:
Malapropisms and spoonerisms are two examples of lapsus linguae. And here is an example of a lapsus linguae which cost a game show contestant a potential one-million-dollar prize.
A lapsus calami is a slip of the pen.
USAGE:
“True, Bush mispronounced the name of Spain’s Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar, but not even that lapsus linguae could sour the mood in the first meeting between the two conservatives.”
Bush’s Gateway to Europe; Los Angeles Times; Jun 22, 2001.
ITALIAN TRANSLATION: untranslated, often simplified in ‘lapsus’

paregmenon

PRONUNCIATION:
(puh-REG-muh-non)
MEANING:
noun: The juxtaposition of words that have the same roots. Examples: sense and sensibility, a manly man, the texture of textile.
ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek paregmenon, from paragein (to bring side by side). Earliest documented use: 1577.
USAGE:
“The Songs poets also used paregmenon for more than two words in succession (“Climbed those high hills,/ Ridged hills and higher heights”).
William McNaughton; The Book of Songs; Twayne Publishers; 1971.
ITALIAN TRANSLATION: DUNNO – Any suggestion?
Well, folks, promise half-kept. It’s not my fault, the terms are really LOST IN TRANSLATION. They’re not even English, if you take a better look (lapsus linguae is fully borrowed from Latin, paregmenon from Greek), they were lost in translation ages ago. Lost in the mists of times.
See you soon, folks …
Your passionate (Italian) Translator
About the artist: May Ann Licudine is a young artist from Philippines. She’s a versatile visual artist,  illustrator, painter, sculptress and toy creator. Poetic and delicate, fanciful and talented. She can perceive and portray the magic of the world with vibrant, blissful touch. I suppose this peculiar talent derives from her efforts of ‘perceiving’ the outside world (she was born with a hearing deficiency, brilliantly overcome through hard work). Here’s her website, take a trip to her (fairy) world!
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